Tenant Eviction Law in Ukraine
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Tenant Eviction Law in Ukraine

The laws concerning properties in the former soviet republic of the Ukraine are pro-landlord although generally the rules for private leases are freely agreed between the landlord and the person or persons renting the property. Increases in rent are not subject to statutory regulation and it is generally left to the parties of landlord and their tenant to agree on the procedures regarding periodic increases in rent, these are usually inline with the countryÂ’s rate of inflation.

The laws concerning properties in the former soviet republic of the Ukraine are pro-landlord although generally the rules for private leases are freely agreed between the landlord and the person or persons renting the property. Increases in rent are not subject to statutory regulation and it is generally left to the parties of landlord and their tenant to agree on the procedures regarding periodic increases in rent, these are usually inline with the country’s rate of inflation.

There is no regulation in place for security deposits to be paid to secure a lease and it is generally left to the parties involved to agree to the cost of such a deposit. Landlords will usually insist on a security deposit being paid before a lease is taken on a property. The deposit can be taken by the landlord if the tenant fails to pay his or her rent on time, equally if the landlord fails in his or her terms of leasing the property then they are liable to pay twice the cost of the security deposit.

At the end of a fixed term contract the landlord is able to evict a tenant with notice, if the tenant refuses to leave at the end of a fixed term contract then the landlord is legally able to expel the tenant from the property. During the terms of the lease if the landlord wishes the tenant to leave then three months notice must be given, the same applies to the tenant wishing to vacate the property. If the property has become unfit for human habitation through the negligence of the landlord then the tenant is legally able to vacate without giving notice.

If the tenant fails to pay the rent due for three consecutive months the contract can be terminated without notice. Equally a tenant can be evicted without notice if they use the property contrary to the agreement of the lease or in a manner not for the intended use of the property. Further reasons for evicting the tenant can be if the tenant has sublet the property without the landlords consent or the tenants negligence has caused damage or repairs the tenant is liable for are nor completed within a reasonable amount of time.

The tenant can legally vacate the property without notice if the property is not leased in accordance with the terms of the lease or it is not fit for the use as it was intended. Equally if the landlord fails to complete repairs when it is his or her obligation to do so.

If the landlord requires the property for their personal use they can apply through the court to give two months notice for the tenant to terminate the lease. If after a previous complaint over using the property other than for its intended use the tenant continues to do so the landlord may terminate the contract for this breach of the lease. Further if the tenant breaches the rights of their neighbours they can be removed from the property.

There are no special tribunals in place within the Ukraine for hearing the disputes between landlords and tenants over lease agreements. Any such disputes are subjected the commercial courts in the case of business disputes and individual disputes are conducted by the general court system. The law states that disputes should be decided within two months of their being brought to the notice of the courts. In exceptional circumstances it may take three months to hear a case. The reality is far different to what is written by law. It is usually not observed as many cases have several months or even years to wait before an outcome is decided.

 

Consumer advisory: For those requesting information, please find details about our ongoing litigation against Mark Mazza, Patrick Williams, and PromoCodeWatch, LLC.
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Comments (4)

Your wise article denotes the need for using intelligent choices when dealing in this country. thank you.

Nice and informative article.

Very thorough research on the subject..

Thanks for sharing this information.

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